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A Blog From Dreamer's Perspective

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These are unsettling times for all of us.  I hope my blog, From Dreamer’s perspective,  brings a smile to your your face and puts love in your heart.

(My Mom has to to write my blog for me since I don’t have opposable thumbs.  So, I tell her what to write (she’s able to hear what I have to say) and then she can tell you what I have to say.)

Happy Hump Day! My name is Dreamer and I’m a Newfoundland Doug.  For those of you who aren’t familiar with Newfoundlands here's a few characteristics of the Newfoundland that might endear me to you.  We as a breed: are gorgeous, smart, sweet and highly trainable. The down side is we’re big and we DROOL.

Newfoundland At a glance

The Newfoundland requires plenty of food during the first year of growth, gaining up to 100 pounds. After that, however, its metabolism slows.

Size:

Weight Range:

Male: 130-150 lbs.
Female: 100-120 lbs.

Height at Withers:

Male: 28 in.

Female: 26 in.

Features:

Floppy ears (naturally)

Expectations:

Exercise Requirements: 20-40 minutes/day
Energy Level: Laid Back
Longevity Range: 8-10 yrs.
Tendency to Drool: High Tendency to Snore: Low
Tendency to Bark: Low
Tendency to Dig: Low Social/Attention Needs: Moderate

 

Now back to my life…last night, I thought we should talk about the state of this world but this morning, but I awakened to snow!!!! It is one of my very favorite things in the entire world, next to food of course. And an EARTHQUAKE (5.7).  My Mom’s been in lots of them so she told me to drop (I did that), hold (a little tricky for me) and cover (even more challenging). Many people don’t realize how sentient animals are.  Someday, My Mom must tell you about Jackson (one of my predecessors, a Golden Retriever) who had experienced a few earthquakes in his lifetime.  But enough about him; I want to talk about me and what’s going on in my life today.

The thing she didn’t realize is that I knew the earthquake was coming BEFORE it came.  How?

Animals are able to detect the first of an earthquake's seismic waves—the P-wave, or pressure wave, that arrives in advance of the S-wave, or secondary, shaking wave. This likely explains why animals have been seen snapping to attention, acting confused or running right before the ground starts to shake.

So, getting back to my day.  Snow, YAY!!!! Earthquake no pun intended a bit unsettling.  But what I’m itching for is a nice walk with my humans.  But they keep talking about earthquakes and COVID 19.  I want to go for a walk in the wonderful, cold snow with boundless enthusiasm.  I think that what happens tomorrow will happen tomorrow.  So enjoy your today.  From my perspective, I think you’ll be glad you did.

With Love,

Dreamer

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